Shopify vs WordPress: Which Is Better For Building Your Online Store?

Last updated on May 7, 2019

Ecommerce retail sales are estimated to hit just shy of $5 trillion by 2021, and if you’re interested in getting in on the action, there’s never been a better time. It’s now easier than ever to create your own online store thanks to platforms like Shopify and WordPress.

Both are goliaths in the web building space, but they do cater to very different needs. We’re here to help you decide which one is right for you: Shopify or WordPress.

Shopify is a world-renowned ecommerce platform, used by major businesses and celebrities alike – Budweiser, Gymshark and Kylie Jenner, to name a few. It powers over 600,000 online stores in total, and offers a simple, user-friendly way to get online.

Below, you can see how Shopify scored in our independent research testing:

Best all-around ecommerce platform
Top Choice

4.7out of 5

Ease Of Use

4 out of 5 stars

Design Flexibility

4 out of 5 stars

Sales Features

5 out of 5 stars

Website Features

4.5 out of 5 stars

Customer Score

5 out of 5 stars

Help and Support

4.5 out of 5 stars

Value For Money

3.5 out of 5 stars

WordPress is an open source content management system. Staggeringly, it’s the force behind almost a third of all websites on the internet. WordPress isn’t automatically set up for ecommerce, but there are some great plugins you can install to start selling online.

Shopify and WordPress differ massively in a whole host of key areas, so knowing which one is better can be difficult. Luckily, we’re here to help.

Website Builder Expert is made up of exactly that – experts. We’ve independently researched and tested tons of platforms, including these two, and are now in the perfect position to share our findings with you.

By the end of this guide, you’ll know what the major differences are, and have a clear idea of whether Shopify or WordPress is best for you.

1

What’s the Difference between Shopify and WordPress?

Shopify is what’s known as a ‘website builder’. So to understand what Shopify is, we first need to know what a website builder is.

A website builder is an online tool that helps people with limited or no technical knowledge build their very own website. They then pay a small fee each month to the website builder platform in order to keep their site live.

Shopify is built specifically for ecommerce, so it’s only ever used for creating online stores (as opposed to blogs or online résumés).

WordPress is a little different. It comes in two forms – WordPress.com and WordPress.org.

WordPress.com is a blogging platform that  works in the same way as a website builder, allowing you to easily create your own website. WordPress.org is self-hosted software, and is far more technically advanced.

You can create just about any type of website with WordPress.org – including online stores – so it’s this version of WordPress that we’ll be comparing to Shopify.

Want to learn more about WordPress.com? Read our full review of the platform here.

Shopify vs WordPress: Pros and Cons

Shopify ProsShopify Cons
  • You have to pay extra transaction fees (0.5% – 2% per transaction) unless you use Shopify’s own payment gateway
  • If you choose to change your theme, you will have to reformat your content
  • It’s still not as basic or as simple to use as a drag-and-drop platform, like Wix

WordPress ProsWordPress Cons
  • More powerful and flexible than Shopify, allowing for total customization
  • Its new editor, ‘Gutenberg’, makes it slightly easier to use
  • There are a huge amount of helpful resources online, both from user forums and professional developers
  • You will need a decent level of technical knowledge to use the platform
  • It can get very expensive, very quickly
  • You will need to source things like hosting, security, and a domain name yourself
2

How Easy Are They to Use?

Coding is the biggest difference when it comes to Shopify vs WordPress. With Shopify, you can create and customize your online store without needing to know a single line of code.

You’ll start off by telling Shopify a little bit about your current position – whether you already sell online or in person and, if so, what your current revenue is.

From here, you’ll enter Shopify’s dashboard. Think of this like your control room, from which you can manage anything to do with your online store. There are even prompts and tips to help you know how and where to start.

shopify dashboard
Shopify’s dashboard provides a gentle slope into designing your own ecommerce website.

Adding products is really simple, too. You can either add them individually – by uploading your product shots and adding descriptions, prices, and variants – or in bulk, by importing an existing CSV file with all your product information.

The interface is similar to a word document, so you shouldn’t get stuck inputting any information. And even if you do, there’s always support on hand.

shopify products
Adding products on Shopify is really straightforward.

WordPress is a little more complex. For starters, you’ll need to know how to code – even if it’s just at a basic level – to use the platform.

It’s also not naturally set up to sell online, so you will need to install a plugin to make your website ecommerce ready.

There are plenty of ecommerce plugins out there – such as WooCommerce, Ecwid, WP eCommerce, and BigCommerce – so it’s important to spend some time reading up on them before deciding which to use.

Like Shopify, WordPress has its own centralized dashboard where you can manage your website. Because WordPress is such a vast platform, it can get a little overwhelming as there are simply so many tools and options.

wordpress dashboard
Everything is manages through the WordPress dashboard.

It’s pretty simple to create content and add products, but when it comes to customizing your site’s appearance, things can get a little tricky.

Your best bet is to either spend plenty of time learning all the tricks of the WordPress trade, or pay for a developer to help you – although they can charge eye-watering fees.

Shopify vs WordPress: Ease of Use – Winner

Shopify is without a doubt the easier platform to use. Unlike WordPress, you don’t need to have an understanding of code, nor do you need to install extra software that allows you to sell online. With Shopify, all the necessary ecommerce features are built-in.

3

What's the Build Time Like with Shopify and WordPress?

Build time is directly linked to ease of use. Naturally, the easier a platform is to use, the quicker it will be for you to set up.

Shopify is undoubtedly the quicker option when creating an online store. It’s a website builder that’s specifically designed to help you make an ecommerce website.

Shopify is not suitable if you don’t want to sell online. So if you just need a regular personal or business site – and value your time – then something like Wix or Squarespace is far better suited.

Read in more detail about Wix in our review here. Or, check out how Squarespace can help you.

WordPress offers you the chance to build both ecommerce and non-ecommerce websites. However, the set up time is longer for two main reasons:

Firstly, WordPress is far more technical and therefore harder to get your head around. Plus, you have to install extra ecommerce plugins if you want to build an online store.

Secondly, you have to set up things like web hosting, security, and a domain name separately.

Shopify vs WordPress: Build Time – Winner

Because ease of use has a direct impact on build time, Shopify is the quicker option. Again, everything you need is built-in, which saves you bags of time otherwise spent deciding on which ecommerce plugin to use on WordPress –  not to mention sorting out hosting and security.

4

Templates and Theme

Templates (often referred to as themes), are the basic layout of your website. Think of them like a PowerPoint design, where you choose how your slides will look before adding in the content.

Shopify has over 70 themes for you to pick from.

10 of these themes are free, while the other 60+ start from $140. That sounds steep, but it’s a one-off investment that helps bring your website to life.

Importantly, these are all mobile responsive, meaning your site’s layout will adapt automatically to fit different screen sizes when people are browsing on their mobile or tablet.

shopify themes
Shopify’s theme store lets you browse, preview, and even sort by category.

When it comes to choice, WordPress blows Shopify out of the water. WordPress offers over 1,000 themes – and that’s just for ecommerce!

There are also plenty more themes that plugins either provide themselves, or that are made by third party developers.

wordpress themes
While WordPress itself has over 200 themes, there are over 5,000 designed by third parties available on WordPress.org

Inevitably, with such a large range to pick from, some WordPress themes are better than others. Not all are mobile responsive, and the ones not designed by WordPress itself may clash with the platform when updates roll around.

For this reason, we’d recommend using one of WordPress’ own ecommerce themes. You’ll also be able to customize them to your heart’s content. If you have a sound knowledge of coding, the control over your site’s aesthetic is pretty much limitless.

Shopify vs WordPress: Templates and Themes – Winner

Ultimately, Shopify vs WordPress themes comes down to whether you want simplicity or customization. Shopify’s themes are responsive and out-of-the-box, but there’s limited choice and they can only be edited so much. WordPress themes vary in quality, but you can customize everything. For us, it’s a tie.

5

Ecommerce Tools and Features

Tools and features are the meat and bones of an ecommerce website. They’re what help you market and sell your products.

Shopify has its own in-house ecommerce tools for you to use, whereas WordPress relies on ecommerce features provided by third party plugins.

Shopify Features

Shopify allows you to sell an unlimited amount of products on any pricing plan. You can also sell both physical products, and digital downloads.

All the main marketing, shipping, inventory and analytical tools are built-in, with alternative or more advanced versions of each offered in Shopify’s app store at an additional charge.

Shopify has hundreds of ecommerce features. We’ll drill down into  the top ones, and why they’re so important:

  • Abandoned Cart Recovery – Set up your site to send email reminders to customers who leave your website with items in their cart before checking out.  
  • Discount Codes – Create unique codes that customers can use at your checkout for money off. These are also great to use in email marketing.
  • Multi Channel Integration – Don’t just limit yourself to your website, sell directly across major social media platforms and global marketplaces, like Facebook and Amazon.
shopify ecommerce stats
Shopify's sales features are proven to boost ecommerce performance.

WordPress Features

To clarify, WordPress does not have any ecommerce features to start with. These need to be added via third party plugins.

Because each plugin offers tons of different ecommerce features, it’s impossible to say what your specific website may have. To give you a flavor of what you could expect, though, here’s what two of the most popular plugins – WooCommerce and Ecwid – offer:

WooCommerce Features

woocommerce features
WooCommerce is built by the same company that created WordPress.
  • Sell unlimited products, both physical and digital
  • Built-in blogging option
  • Product reviews and ratings
  • Product sorting and filtering

Ecwid Features

ecwid features
Ecwid integrates with WordPress or Wix seamlessly and can be used for free.
  • Guest checkouts
  • Save favorite products
  • Shipping calculator
  • Multilingual translation

Shopify vs WordPress: Ecommerce Tools and Features – Winner

WordPress just edges this one. You can search around for a plugin that ticks all the boxes you’re looking for and install it. That said, you’ll struggle to find much you can’t do with Shopify – almost everything imaginable is covered by a tool or app.

6

Payment Options and Transaction Fees

How you accept payments could be the difference between making a sale or not. It’s important to present your customers with the most popular options.

Shopify supports more than 100 different payment gateways, including all the big hitters: PayPal, Stripe, Square, Amazon Pay, and Apple Pay.

It also has its own payment gateway – Shopify payments – which can process orders in most major currencies.

The benefit of opting for Shopify Payments is that you won’t be charged an additional transaction fee.

With the other payment gateways, you can expect charges of between 0.5% to 2% per transaction, depending on which Shopify pricing plan you sign up to.

shopify transaction fees
The difference in transaction fees charges across Shopify’s premium plans.

Similar to its ecommerce features, WordPress’ payment options are provided through its plugins. WooCommerce, Ecwid and WP eCommerce all cover most major gateways, and you won’t be charged anything more on top of each one’s own transaction fee.

Below, you can see which major payment gateways are supported by each platform/plugin:

Platforms / PluginsCredit/Debit CardsPayPalStripeSquareAmazon PayApple PayOwn Payment Gateway
Shopify
WooCommerceX
Ecwid
XX
WP eCommerceXXX

Shopify vs WordPress: Payment Options and Transaction Fees – Winner

It’s another tie. While Shopify is the best-rounded in terms of payment options, you will incur extra charges if you use anything other than Shopify Payments. None of WordPress’ plugins can match Shopify for payment options, but there are no extra charges.

7

Which is better for SEO?

Search Engine Optimization (SEO for short) is the process of increasing your website’s visibility on search engines, like Google and Bing, by tweaking certain aspects of it.

Shopify allows you to do this in a number of ways, including adding specific titles and descriptions that appear in search results for each web page (metadata), and customizing your URLs and site structure so it’s easier for search engines to understand, or ‘crawl’.

There are a whole bunch of other neat SEO features too, but we’re not going to get bogged down in that here. Instead, head over to out Shopify SEO review for a full breakdown of exactly what you can and can’t do to optimize your site.

WordPress SEO, you won’t be surprised to learn, is done through external plugins. The most popular SEO WordPress plugin is Yoast, which can either be used for free, or for $69 to get its advanced features.

Shopify vs WordPress: SEO – Winner

Another area, another win for Shopify. Not only are most of its SEO capabilities built-in, you can also install SEO specific apps if there’s anything more advanced you want to do. There is a common belief that website builders are bad for SEO, but Shopify emphatically dispels that myth.

8

Is There Any Ongoing Maintenance?

Both Shopify and WordPress will carry out their own routine updates.

While using Shopify this will happen automatically, and won’t affect you in the slightest. However it’s something you may have to keep an eye on with WordPress.

WordPress’ main software, themes, and plugins can all update at different times, and if you’re not using a theme or plugin that is built by WordPress itself, you may lose track of things.

Think of this like paying your bills. If you live in rented accommodation and have your bills included, you don’t need to worry about the individual cost of each utility. However, bills can become harder to manage if you need to sort out your water, heating, and electricity separately.

To avoid the hassle, we recommend using a hosting provider that takes care of updates for you. Bluehost came top of our hosting research for WordPress websites, offering one-click installs and automated updates.

The same applies for your website’s security. With Shopify, you get an SSL certificate included in each plan which protects you and your site’s visitors data. This is yet another thing you will have to research and pay for individually with WordPress.

Shopify vs WordPress: Ongoing Maintenance & Security – Winner

Shopify maintains its dominance over WordPress with another win. Shopify and WordPress are both striving to make their platform perfect so updates are inevitable – the difference is you need to keep on top of WordPress’ updates, while Shopify’s don’t require a second thought.

9

Customer Help and Support

Shopify’s customer help is second to none. You can receive 24/7 help in a variety of ways, including by phone, email, live chat, and via Shopify’s onsite help center.

On top of that, customers on the Shopify Plus plan will gain access to their very own merchant success manager, who is responsible for providing you with constant guidance.

shopify help center
Shopify has excellent support in place to help you out, whether it’s guides, phone, forums, or videos

WordPress is different in that there is no direct help. There are only resources, such as forums, that provide support.

As we know, WordPress is a far more technical platform, and as such, it doesn’t anticipate that its users will need their hand holding. It’s also free, so you’re not paying to get quality service.

wordpress forums
WordPress only has a forum packed full of technical information.

There is a wealth of information online about WordPress, but you’ll have to sift through some ‘fake news’ to find the really helpful stuff.

Shopify vs WordPress: Customer Help & Support – Winner

Shopify takes this category comfortably. There may not be the level of information online that there is about WordPress, but there’s no substitute for personal, dedicated help. The sheer number of ways you can contact Shopify for support make it the obvious winner.

10

How Much Do They Cost?

Cost is one of the most important factors when deciding to invest in anything, and deciding between Shopify and WordPress is no different.

Shopify offers a 14-day free trial and three main plans, along with Shopify Lite (which allows you to set up a Facebook store), and Shopify Plus (an enterprise-level plan sold on a quote by quote basis).

99% of you will probably be best off with one of the three main plans, so that’s what we’ll discuss. Below, you can see a breakdown of the prices, as well as the savings you can make on each if you commit to a longer term:   

Shopify Pricing PlansShopify BasicShopifyAdvanced Shopify
Monthly$29.00$79.00$299.00
1-Year
$/month
$26.10$71.10$269.10
Savings (%)10%10%10%
2-Years
$/month
$23.20$63.20$239.20
Savings (%)20%20%20%

 

Most small merchants will find Shopify Basic perfectly adequate. You’ll receive access to all the themes, use the same editor, get 24/7 support, and have the majority of ecommerce features.

The benefit of upgrading to the Shopify plan is that, on top of all that, you’ll have a detailed reporting tool and abandoned cart recovery. Two massive bonuses to any business.

The Advanced Shopify plan again goes one step further, letting you in on advanced reporting and real-time shipping.

For us, the Shopify plan at $79/month is the best value for money. The abandoned cart recovery in itself can easily help you recoup the $50 difference in upgrade cost each month.

WordPress on the other hand is entirely free to use. Don’t be fooled, though, it’s far from free once you get up and running.

Here you can see exactly how much everything will cost you to set up, and how ‘free’ can quickly become a few hundred bucks.

WordPress Website Hosting CostsMonthly Costs: anywhere between $5 – $100
  • Self-hosted shared hosting: $5 – $20
  • Fully managed hosting: $30 – $100
WordPress Tutorials & Courses CostsMonthly Costs: free to $50+
  • Time to Learn Basics: A few hours
  • Time to Learn WordPress: Weeks
WordPress Theme CostsOne-time Cost: free to $5,000+
  • Basic Templates: $35 – $50
  • Premium Templates: $80 – $200
  • Template Alterations: $300 – $1,000
  • Custom Design: $5,000 – $10,000+
WordPress Plugin CostsOne-Time Cost: $50 – $500
and/or
Monthly Costs: $5 – $150
  • Payment Software:
  • $100 – $500 (one-time cost)
  • $30 – $80 (monthly cost)
  • Membership Gateway Software:
  • $100 – $300 (one-time cost)
  • $50-$150 (monthly cost)
  • Email Marketing Software:
  • $5 – $99 (monthly cost)

On the upside, WordPress’ WooCommerce plugin is free to use. Ecwid also has a free plan, but you can only sell unlimited products with Ecwid Unlimited, which costs $99/month.

A good way of thinking about Shopify vs WordPress in terms of costs is through hotels.

Shopify is the all-inclusive package that seems more expensive at first, but once you’re there, everything you need is included. WordPress is initially the more budget-friendly option, until you realize you need to pay for everything, from your food and drink, to beachside sunbeds.

Shopify vs WordPress: Cost – Winner

Despite the fact that WordPress is technically free, Shopify is much cheaper overall. Plans range from $29/month – $299/month and include everything you need. WordPress is free to use, but you’ll need to fork out for hosting, themes, and plugins all separately.

11

Shopify vs WordPress: Final Thoughts

Shopify vs WordPress is a great battle between two web building heavyweights.

Shopify is an ecommerce website builder that allows you to create an online store without being a master of code. It has some great built-in features and three main pricing plans, each aimed at a different type of person.

WordPress is the more advanced platform. It’s used by developers and tech savvy folk who want total control over their website. It isn’t set up for ecommerce, although there are plenty of reputable plugins you can use to create an online store.

To recap all the areas we’ve looked at, here’s a quick summary table:

AreaShopifyWordPress
Ease of UseEasier to use, requires little to no coding knowledge.More technical but gives you almost limitless customization.
Build TimeQuick to get your store up and running with bulk product uploads and an intuitive dashboard.Slightly lengthier process unless you’re a coding whizz. You’ll need to choose and install an ecommerce plugin.
ThemesOver 70 themes to pick from which are all mobile responsive and designed in-house.Thousands of themes to look through but they vary in quality.
Ecommerce FeaturesComes with all the ecommerce features you need to sell online and scale your business.Most of the main plugins have decent ecommerce features, but you may need to search for separate tools for things like analytics.
Payment and TransactionsOver 100 different payment options and its own gateway. It does charge you its own transaction fees, though.Depends on the plugin you use, but most support the major payment gateways with no transaction fees of their own.
SEOBuilt-in SEO features allow you to optimize your website and improve your web page’s rankings.You’ll need an SEO plugin and will have to pay extra to access premium features which come as standard on Shopify.
MaintenanceUpdates won’t impact on your website as everything is taken care of in-house.Depending on the theme, hosting, and security you go for, updates may affect your site.
Help and Support24/7 help available via phone, email and live chat. There’s also a help center and advanced support for Shopify Plus users.No form of personal support, but there’s plenty of technical information in WordPress’ forums.
CostA 14-day free trial and three main pricing plans which range from $29/month to $299/month.Free to use but can quickly escalate to a few hundred dollars when you pay for themes, hosting, plugins, and tutorials.

We Recommend Shopify if

You have limited technical knowledge and want to create your own online store. It’s easy to keep a track of your budget as everything from your hosting and security, to extra features, is included in one monthly cost.

We Recommend WordPress if

You have some form of coding knowledge or the budget to pay for a developer’s help. You’ll get total control over your site’s customization and have an almost endless number of options when it comes to themes and plugins. However, you will need to be prepared to pay a lot for a top ecommerce site.

Which one you decide on ultimately comes down to your budget and skill level. For us, Shopify is the better overall platform for ecommerce websites. You have everything you need to be successful and grow, all packed into one, easy-to-use dashboard.

Don’t just jump into a rushed decision, though. Try both Shopify and WordPress for free today and make up your own mind. Your very own online store is just a few clicks away.

12

Shopify vs WordPress: FAQs

What is the best WordPress ecommerce plugin?

Generally, it depends on what you need from your online store. The best overall plugin we’ve come across is WooCommerce. It’s built by the same company that created WordPress, has tons of useful features, doesn’t charge its own transaction fees, and can be used for free.

Do you have to pay for hosting with Shopify?

No! With Shopify, hosting is taken care of for you and is provided as part of the monthly fee you pay to use the platform. This is the same for any website builder. It is only self-hosted platforms, like WordPress, where you need to source your own hosting separately.

What is the best hosting provider for WordPress?

Many web hosting providers have hosting specifically designed for WordPress websites. From our research, Bluehost has the best WordPress hosting service, with features like one-click installs and automated updates. You can read more about all the best WordPress hosting providers here.

Can Shopify and WordPress be used together?

Yes! WordPress actually has a Shopify plugin. This allows you to use a Shopify theme on your WordPress site and gives you ecommerce functionality. It also lets you link your WordPress site to Facebook and receive 24/7 support, all for just $9/month.

What’s the best non-ecommerce website builder?

If you’re not interested in selling online – or just want to shift the odd product or two – Wix is the platform for you. It’s incredibly easy to use, with an intuitive drag-and-drop editor, and comes packed full of quality features. Read more in our dedicated Wix review.

Website Builder Expert aims to provide you with honest data. That’s why we conduct our own research and obtain direct, personal insight. Click here for further information.
Charlie Carmichael

About Charlie Carmichael

It's my job to research website builders and find out which one's really are best for your specific needs. Having tested numerous builders, I'm in a great position to help you guys not only get online, but have great success once there.

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Charlie Carmichael

About Charlie Carmichael

It's my job to research website builders and find out which one's really are best for your specific needs. Having tested numerous builders, I'm in a great position to help you guys not only get online, but have great success once there.

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