Weebly vs WordPress | 5 Differences For You To Know

Last updated on September 13, 2017

Here are the 5 items you should consider when evaluating Weebly vs WordPress:

 

1) Flexibility

Although you can edit the HTML & CSS codes to your Weebly website, which allows you some freedom to customize the design of your website to a certain extent, Weebly is not an open source website builder so you can’t control how some of their tools work.

What this also means is that if you want to integrate non-Weebly tools into your website, or you want certain features to function differently, you might not be able to do this as their core functions are locked off from public access.

Having said that, if you know a little bit of code, you still have good creative control over the design of your website.

Further, since Weebly manages the entire platform for you, you don’t have to worry about any tools not functioning, or your website breaking.

All the website building tools are controlled by Weebly and closely monitored within its own operating environment. What this means is that Weebly takes care of all the technical aspects of your website, so you can focus on building out your content.

When you have any questions or issues, you can reach out to Weebly’s support team on a 24/7 basis so they can troubleshoot them for you (more on this below).

WordPress is an open source website builder so you have a lot of freedom to modify your website and how your tools work, as you have full access to the platform codes (assuming you are knowledgeable about codes, or if you are working with a coder).

A lot of people prefer using WordPress as its community offers a lot of free plugins so you can add more tools to your website. However,not all WordPress plugins are well built, so using some of these “bad” plugins may potentially expose your website to security issues, or may potentially cause conflicts with other tools that you are using.

The developers of the free plugins are sometimes helpful if you have troubleshooting questions, but some of them are not as helpful (since the plugin is free). At times, some developers may even blame other plugins for causing any conflicts, resulting in a finger pointing war and your issue doesn’t get resolved (more about support below).

Investing in premium plugins will entitle you to support, but even still this does not necessarily guarantee that they will fix all the issues for you as the conflicts may be caused by other plugins (which is beyond the premium plugin developers’ control).

On the other hand, there are some really good WordPress plugins out there that can really add a ton of flexibility to your website. But you should most definitely test them thoroughly with your website before deploying the plugin. Using the right plugin can improve your website’s functionality, but a poorly built plugin can have negative impact on your website’s performance.

2) Ease of Use

Weebly is probably the easiest website builder available in the market today, and it is a much easier platform to use than WordPress.

It’s a drag & drop website builder,
so you can just drag in your content, move them around, all without having to know how to code at all.

If you don’t have any technical skills, or if you don’t have any interest or time to learn codes, then Weebly is a really good choice for you to consider using to build your website.

Weebly has a pretty good help center, but in our experience we didn’t need to use it too much as their tools are very intuitive, and easy to use. But if you need to find out more information about how to use some of its features, the help guides are there for you.

Compared to Weebly, WordPress is a lot more challenging to learn how to use (much higher learning curve).

WordPress is not a drag and drop website builder, and so how you are able to place your content (such as slideshows, videos, etc) is largely dependent on how the design template you choose is set up.

If you want to alter the template format, such as re-arranging the layout of the page, you’ll have to modify the codes to the template in order to do so, or hire a capable coder to help you accomplish that.

Basically, even though WordPress is a very powerful & flexible platform, if you want to use it effectively, it’s inevitable that you will need to modify codes. If you are able to do that, this website builder could deliver you a much more advanced website than Weebly.

3) User Support

As discussed above, Weebly has a good library of help guides
if you have any questions on how to use their tools.

But one of the beauties of Weebly is that their builder is so easy to use, you really don’t need a whole lot of guidance to build your first website.

Beyond the help guides, if you feel like you need more hands on support, Weebly provides you with 24/7 email support, and live chat or phone support during business hours.

As discussed above, since all the tools are built and managed by Weebly directly, they will be able to take ownership of any issues and troubleshoot them (instead of bouncing this responsibility to other tool developers).

Lastly, one of the benefits of Weebly having its own support team, is that all your questions will be answered, even if thousands of other people have already asked the same question before (unlike the WordPress forum).

WordPress has a massive community forumwhere you can post questions hoping other WordPress users or developers will answer them.

While a lot of the questions are responded to (but not necessarily resolved), a lot of posts are not answered at all. Further, getting some sort of answer might take many days as most moderators are volunteers, so there is no huge sense of urgency.

One of the main challenges is that there are thousands of questions being posted, and a lot of them have already been discussed before in other post threads.
So your questions may be ignored as they have already been discussed in one of the many thousands of posts, and you may have to sort through all of them to find that discussion.

At the end of the day, no one is really obligated to answer your question unless you pay for it (such as hiring a WordPress coder to help you out). And given WordPress.org and a lot of its plugins are free, getting someone to sort out your technical issues can be challenging.

4) Ongoing Maintenance

As mentioned, Weebly is a closed system in which they manage all the technical issues for you. This includes all the performance and security updates, so you don’t have to worry about the technical aspects of building websites.

All of this is monitored and managed by Weebly in the background, so you don’t have to stress about ensuring that your site is up to date, or worry about some tools causing conflicts and negatively impacting your website.

Having all this managed for you frees up your time, so you can focus on other things that might be more important to you.

Similar to Weebly, WordPress is continually updating & improving its platform to fix bugs and improve its security. When an update is deployed, you’ll get a notification message to update your version of WordPress. This can be done by a simple click of the “update” button.

Unfortunately, that is the easier part. The harder part is that when WordPress updates, your template and the plugins that you are using will also need to be updated as well to ensure that they continue to work properly with the latest version of WordPress. This is up to the template / plugin creator to do so.

While a lot of template and plugin developers will also update to remain compatible, some won’t (especially for free template & plugins). This can expose your website to potential user, performance or security issues.

So if you decide to use WordPress, keep in mind that there will be ongoing maintenance work, as it is not uncommon for certain functions to “break” when WordPress have updates.

5) Pricing & Ongoing Financial Commitments

Weebly offers you 4 premium plans, ranging from $5 to $45 per month (pricing based on 2 year plans. If you choose their 6 months or 1 year plan, the price per month goes up a little bit).

The higher then plan, the more tools and features you will be able to access. Note that you can still use Weebly for free, but it will display a Weebly advertisement on your webpages. This can only be removed when you upgrade to one of their paid plans

Their premium plans grant you access to more tools and website building features, such as header slideshows, site search, more ecommerce and marketing capabilities, membership login, etc. All plans (including the free plan) give you access to Weebly’s easy to use drag & drop builder, over 100 design templates, hosting services and dedicated support team.

If you sign up to a premium plan, Weebly also gives you a free custom domain name for your first year.

Using Weebly to build your website is much like an all-inclusive package where all your website building needs are provided and serviced by Weebly. You won’t have to piece together bits and pieces like you would have to with WordPress.

The ongoing cost of using Weebly can range from
$60 (Starter plan)
to $540 per year (Performance plan).

I think that just the 24/7 email support, and live chat & phone support, as well as having all the technology managed for you to free up your time, is well worth the paid plans.

To build your website with WordPress.org, you will have to pay for your own hosting service which costs around $7 per month (note: the price range varies depending on the quality of the hosting service provider. Bluehost is a popular WordPress hosting service ).

A premium design template can cost you from $30 – $80, depending on the reputation of the template provider.

While most plugins are free, some of them are paid / premium as well (ranging from $15 – $50 per plugin), depending on what you need and if you want support (as mentioned above).

You will also have to purchase your own custom domain name ($10 – $15 per year).

Your initial investment building your site with WordPress can range from $139 to over $200, depending how many premium plugins you end up using.

If you hire a coder to help you build your website, make modifications or for fixing some website issues, your cost will increase quite a bit on an ongoing basis, and can be a challenge to budget for.

Also, remember that the learning curve of using WordPress effectively is also a lot higher than using drag & drop website builders. So you should factor in the cost of your own time as well.

See our Detailed Review Weebly Review WordPress Review

Summary:

Weebly:

Weebly is probably one of the easiest website builders to use, and requires no coding knowledge as you just have to drag & drop content around and publish your website.  There is no backend technical maintenance requirement from you, as all this is taken care by Weebly’s technical team, which greatly helps lower costs and ongoing commitments over the long run.  But your website will be a lot less customizable when compared to using WordPress, as at the end of the day Weebly’s core platform is closed off to users so you can’t make more advanced custom changes to your website.

WordPress:

Gives you a lot more flexibility and you can highly customize the functionality of your website (if you know a bit of coding).  Using WordPress does require you to be a lot more hands-on in managing ongoing website and hosting maintenance work, and does pose a much higher initial learning curve.  You will most likely have a higher financial commitment over the long run, as costs are less predictable, depending on whether you need to hire a coder to help you, the frequency of hiring, and the quality / caliber of the coder.

Website Builder (Weebly) vs WordPress SEO Guide – see our opinion about SEO with website builders such as Weebly and how it compares to WordPress.

Considering other website builders?

Take a look at our Website Builder Comparison Chart, or take a Free Quiz to see which website builder matches your needs.

If you are unsure whether Weebly is right for you then take a look at our Top Website Builder Recommendations and guide on how to pick the best one.

Also see our Comparison Chart of Website Builders for more detailed differences

Not sure which website builder works best for you? Try our Website Builder Matching Quiz

Click here to see our full, comprehensive discussion comparing Weebly and WordPress

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Jeremy Wong

About Jeremy Wong

Maybe just like you, at first we didn't have a darn clue about how to build a website, nevermind write half a line of code if our life depended on it! We wanted to build a website to start a side business, and felt overwhelmed, confused & scared about how to actually do it, which builder to use, and making wrong decisions. After years of trials & errors using different website builders, we're here to share our experiences with you.

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Jeremy Wong

About Jeremy Wong

Maybe just like you, at first we didn't have a darn clue about how to build a website, nevermind write half a line of code if our life depended on it! We wanted to build a website to start a side business, and felt overwhelmed, confused & scared about how to actually do it, which builder to use, and making wrong decisions. After years of trials & errors using different website builders, we're here to share our experiences with you.

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37 Responses to Weebly vs WordPress | 5 Differences For You To Know

  1. #

    Hi, Great comparison! I was wondering why you didn’t compare Weebly to WordPress.com, which to me is the better comparison. I began at Weebly then switched a year later. Now I’m back at Weebly writing a step-by-step guide for my Dad because even though he’s been using Weebly for years, all the changes have it made it more difficult for him and he’s been frustrated.

    One big reason I switched was I wanted to do most of my work using an iPad. That was before Weebly had their mobile apps. I have tried Weebly’s mobile apps since then but they just can’t compare to the WordPress ones which are robust and easier than their web tools are. Weebly’s just don’t work well for sites with more than a few pages.

    The one aspect I think Weebly is much less user friendly in is creating links to your own content…if this is important to someone, go with WordPress.com.

    And that’s the one aspect that I think your comparison falls a little short…because it doesn’t discuss WordPress.com…which is free, just like Weebly is.

    But overall I like your comparison a lot and wish it had been around back when I was trying to decide which way to go…so thank you 🙂

    • Tom Watts
      #

      Hi vsatips,

      Thanks for sharing your feedback with the community, it’s definitely important to hear as many opinions as possible!

      The reason we haven’t looked at WordPress.com in this discussion is because it’s a more limited platform than WordPress.org, and is geared more towards very casual usual who are after a no-frills blogging platform.

      It’s can be hard to maximize your website’s potential on WordPress.com, so it would be unfair to compare it with Weebly, which is a much more versatile and powerful all-round website builder.

      Have you given Weebly another go now that there are mobile apps available for you to try? It would be interesting to hear whether you thought they were handy or not.

      Thanks,
      – Tom

  2. #

    Do not use Weebly for a European website!
    I made a capital mistake by using weekly. Not at the start but afterwards I realised following:
    -They do not connect to European payment methods and do not want to implement this. Unbelievable.
    -Not an efficient solution for translations
    As weekly was not willing to solve these blocking issues I had to go through the tremendous effort to move my website to a new platform. Please do not make the same mistake as me if you are based in Europe.

    • Tom Watts
      #

      Hi karel,

      Sorry to hear about your experience with Weebly.

      It’s surprising to hear that you couldn’t connect a European payment method to your Weebly ecommerce store (I’m assuming it’s a store as you mentioned payment methods!). As far as I’m aware, at least 3 of Weebly’s 5 payment gateway partners offer varying levels of European support.

      Both Stripe and Authorize.net can accept payments from most European countries, as can PayPal. I’ve linked to the respective pages detailing these country limitations.

      I will add though, that if you wanted to use a different payment gateway provider, then this would be prove to be an issue as Weebly cannot currently integrate third party payment gateways.

      I know these restrictions can be frustrating and I totally get that, believe me. You’d hope a global company like Weebly would make their service as inclusive as possible – and hopefully one day it will!

      On the translation front, did you try out either of the apps ‘Multilanguage’ or ‘LocalizeInternet’? Both are recommended by Weebly as the best options for multi-lingual sites. So definitely worth considering for anyone else reading the comments in a similar situation.

      As a side note, for a solid ecommerce platform that offers a huge variety of payment methods around the world – and can cope with multi-lingual sites – it’s worth giving Shopify a look at (Here’s a our review).

      – Tom

  3. #

    I want to know apart from seo which website ranks weebly or wordpress, and please suggest me i am going to start a blog which platform should i choose?

    • Tom Watts
      #

      Hi Dev,

      SEO stands for search engine optimisation, which essentially refers to all the things you can do to your website to help it rank better in search engine results pages – you can learn about it in more depth in this article.

      Rather than focus on which platform is best (they are mostly all the same in term of ranking factors – no one builder has an advantage), you should focus on creating in-depth and interesting content that your target audience would find interesting.

      In terms of ease of use though, I would definitely say Weebly is a much more user-friendly and intuitive platform to create a website on.

      Hope that helps,
      – Tom

  4. #

    very helpful. thank you.

  5. #

    This is one of the best detailed and practical explanations of the comparison between Weebly and WordPress on the web. Thank you for keeping it simple in the midst of the overwhelming chasm of info on the internet!

    Nadia Adams (N.R. Adams – Sensum)

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks, Nadia. Glad you found our comparison helpful!

  6. #

    Hi Jeremy,
    Im Freelance Graphic designer & i have a idea to build up a website for designing. also its going to use for commercial propose.. like a small business..
    can you suggest me what is best platform to build up my site?

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hello Eranga,

      Aside from Weebly or WordPress, also check out Squarespace as a lot of designers prefer using them due to their stylish templates and user interface. We have a review on Squarespace here if you’re interested in checking them out.

      Jeremy

  7. #

    And is there a difference for SEO – positions willl be the same ore?

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hey Geert,

      SEO capability is slightly different and a big part of it is dependent on what you do. Have a look at our SEO guide here for more discussions.

      Jeremy

  8. #

    Super helpful. Thank you~~!

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      You’re very welcome, Trina. Please do share this comparison guide with people you think who will find this helpful!

      Jeremy

  9. #

    Hi Jeremy
    Very helpful and extensive. Thanks a lot.
    I just finished my first version on Wix (in 48 hs i had my ecommerce on line).
    I was very concerned, about speed, Seo, i was thinking that i will be forced to move to wordpress in order to fence these “limitations”. Now i see light at the end of the tunnel.

    I see somethings that the ecommerce app, cant do, but this is not a big deal.

    What do you think that WordPress enables to combine, blog, website and ecommerce in an unique site and Wix cant do it? Is it true? Is it a big cons?

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hello Claudio,

      There are a lot of things that WordPress can do that Wix couldn’t, as WordPress is heavily customizable and there is a large pool of service providers (plugin creators) that create additional add-on tools for WordPress users.

      A huge pro of using WordPress is flexibility. The con is that WordPress is more technically challenging and if you end up using a bad plugin, it can cause a lot of trouble for your website.

      Jeremy

  10. #

    Hi Jeremy,
    Thanks so much for this comparison! Am currently taking a WP design class, but it has been challenging and I realize I don’t want to invest more time or complete further WP classes to get my site up and running. I’m just not that into the technical end of things. I have a current website built from templates through a professional organization I belong to that I am interested in updating. My current hosting company interfaces with both WP and Weebly, so I will go the Weebly route. Thanks for making the decision much easier! BTW is there a print button that I missed? Would love to print out the side by side chart. Thanks!

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hello Arianna,

      Thanks for sharing your experiences with us. Glad our comparison here is helpful to you.

      we don’t have a proper print function, but if you press “Control P” on your keyboard, it should initiate the web browser’s print function. It’s not perfect (the printed format), but you’ll have our comparison across a few pieces of paper.

      Jeremy

      • #

        Hi Jeremy,
        thanks again for a great article. I am curious about Arianna’s comment, that she has a current hosting company that interfaces with both WP and Weebly – it is my understanding that Weebly sites can only be hosted by Weebly, and hosting is not transferable. Is this correct? If so how can her comment be right?
        Thanks
        Julia

        • Jeremy Wong
          #

          Hey Julie,

          Good question. There are two ways to build your website using Weebly:

          1) Use Weebly.com directly.

          2) Use Weebly through a hosting company (such as Bluehost).

          Weebly has partnered with a number of hosting companies to offer their drag & drop website building platform to the hosting companies’ customers.

          There are pros and cons to using Weebly through a hosting company. I usually suggest people use Weebly directly at Weebly.com.

          Here is a comparison guide about this. The images are slightly outdated, but the idea is still relevant today.

          Jeremy

  11. #

    Can I start from Weebly and import to WordPress at some point in case I need to, or want to have more flexibility over functionality or design of my website? Or do I have to redo everything on some WordPress template for that?

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hello Kamoliddin,

      Unfortunately, Weebly doesn’t have a function where it can export content in a WordPress compatible format, and importing it into WordPress.

      If you want to port your website content from Weebly to WordPress, you’ll have to manually copy and paste text, re-upload your images, and configure your design in WordPress again.

      If being able to move over content to a WordPress site is important to you, take a look at Squarespace. This website builder allows you to export (most) content over to WordPress. Squarespace is a really good website builder as well.

      Jeremy

  12. #

    Thanks for your comparison. I also compared the two, and chose wordpress basically because of the ease of posting from Mobile.
    For many of us, mobile access is required as we are prohibited from blogging at work.

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hi Gadi,

      Actually, Weebly has a dedicated mobile app where you can also publish blog posts with it. Take a look at this page here to find out more about their mobile app.

      Jeremy

  13. #

    Thanks Jeremy. Loved the chart format.

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks Mark! Please do share this page with others by clicking on the social sharing buttons to the left side of the screen! I’d highly appreciate it.

      Jeremy

  14. #

    I don’t know coding etc. I thought of to move my site to weebly, but it doesn’t have any importer to move to weebly? I’m using another website builder. WordPress is good but I don’t have any coding knowledge I don’t want to learn those. So I preferred to weebly butt weebly has no importer. in this can I get any help from weebly? I have searched answer for this question but I found one and only “RSS” importar. Through it I can’t import my posts and comments of them.

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Hello Bharath,

      Weebly doesn’t have an importing function. So if you are using another website builder and you want to use Weebly, you’ll have to re-build your content in Weebly.

      It’s a one time investment of your time, and you just have to copy and paste your text, as well as re-upload your images. It’s a bit of a hassle, but you’ll only have to do it once.

      Or, you can hire someone to do this for you. You probably don’t have to spend too much money to hire someone from places like Craiglist to do this for you. Weebly is really easy to use, so almost anyone can do it for you.

      Jeremy

  15. #

    Jeremy. You are knowledgeable. Does weebly support pretty link?

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks Karim.

      Pretty Link is a WordPress plugin, so it won’t work with Weebly.

      Jeremy

  16. #

    Thank you! I’m already using Weebly and like it but nearly every blog and online business refer to WordPress. Since I’m reaching the point of paid vs free, I decided to evaluate again. At this stage Weebly is still the winner due to ease of use. Basically your review gave me peace of mind. Thanks.

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks Tamara! Glad this chart is helpful to you.

      Jeremy

  17. #

    Excellent article which helped me so much as I have no technical expertise. Definitely going with Weebly so I can get things running on my first website without having to worry about the nuts and bolts, updates, security and save some money. Thanks so much!

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks Sherri!

      If you don’t have any technical skills, or have an interest in learning code, Weebly is definitely more suitable for you.

      Good luck!

      Jeremy

  18. #

    Thanks, very helpful!

    • Jeremy Wong
      #

      Thanks Diana! Glad you found this comparison helpful to you.

      Jeremy